Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Nate Kiowa Jones #6765

Members
  • Posts

    1,982
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

Previous Fields

  • SASS #
    6765

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.stevesgunz.com
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Interests
    Old guns

Recent Profile Visitors

8,618 profile views

Nate Kiowa Jones #6765's Achievements

SASS Wire Vet

SASS Wire Vet (1/1)

506

Reputation

  1. Because they primarily used the 5 in 1 blanks the majority of the movie henry's were modified 92's.
  2. I didn't look at the vids but I have cut many shotguns stock for the ladies. The crook of the elbow to the trigger method is a good method for skeet and other games where the gun is already mounted and you don't have to work the action. Doesn't work well for what we do. What I've found for both but particularly for the ladies is the stock should be just long enough to allow the thumb of the trigger hand to be no closer than an 1" but not more than 3" from the shooters nose. Generally, if the stock is longer the crook of the elbow will be extended beyond 90% and because the ladies and youths generally don't have the upper body strength that men do and the ladies also have those protrusion there on their chest that can get in the way, so the gun will be too front heavy. When you see that new shooter leaning way back struggling to hold the gun up that is usually the reason why, the stock is just too long. Also the stocks on most of the CAS SXS guns are designed for aerial targets. When you point them toward the ground the positive toe of those stocks tends to dig into your shoulder when you fire. This will eventually cause the shooter to let the stock move down on shoulder which brings the front end up. Shot goes high. Savvy shooters will lean way into the shot but that usually doesn't ’t work for the lady shooters. So, now that positive toe is nailing them. For the shotguns besides shortening the stock I like cut them so the pad is about 5 degrees negative. That helps take some of the felt recoil away shooting at our ground targets. Here’s a good example. This young lady was 11 years old when this picture was taken. This first pic is her with one of the youth size henry 22’s and as you can see she is still struggling to hold it up. Here she is with a 12ga Baikal SXS that is cut to about 10”LOP with a mercury recoil reducer and good pad. Her stance isn’t that great but she is definitely in more control of the gun.
  3. Here's how I like to slug a bore. I like to use a slug of soft lead that is at least 1 1/2 times long than the bore dia that's being slugged. This extra length assures that the slug doesn't wobble or try to turn in the bore as it's hammered through. This can be verified with short slugs. Measurements will vary depending on where you measure it. The longer slug yields more consistent results. Make sure the bore is clean lead free and lightly oiled, as in an oiled patch pushed through it. You can drive the slug in from the muzzle if you use a leather or rubber mallet so as not to damage the crown. I like to drive it all the way through to feel any high spots or bulges. I like to use a brass or hardwood dowel that is close to bore size. A rod that is too small can deform the soft lead. Next if it's a levergun I use two wooden dowels just smaller than the bore and cut to the cartridge OAL. These are inserted into the chamber end and the action closed. Next the slug is re inserted in the muzzle end and driven to the wood dowel then bumped up so it's now tight. Now, open the action, remove the dowels and gently tap the slug on out. This will give you a really true picture of the bore just in front of the chamber or farther out depending on how many dowels are used. To measure I use a zero-ed Starret micrometer. Most dial calipers aren’t accurate enough.
  4. Most likely a 45 long colt balloon case. They weren't rebated for extractors. If it's short enough it could be a S&W 45, as in Schofield. However I think they were mostly bennet primed, (internal primer)
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.