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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/12/2023 in all areas

  1. I had the honor of pronouncing Scarlett Darlin is the Lady Jedi Gunfighter if the Year. We made the announcement at Louisiana State (because that’s where she was) and boy was she SURPRISED! I think everyone who knows her would agree with her selection. If you’ve been living under a rock: She is the owner of Bullets by Scarlet, a retail outlet to meet the needs of cowboy shooters as well as being a world class gunfighter in her own right. Her business, her shooting, her smiles, hugs and her love of the sport of cowboy action shooting have earned her a stellar reputation worldwide including places like Australia and Alaska. She is one of the best lady gunfighters in the world and is a world champion Lady Frontier Cartridge Gunfighter. She is a tireless promoter of shooting gunfighter and frontier cartridge. As such she is a shining example of what being a Jedi gunfighter means. Possum
    15 points
  2. At that point the "pistol target" becomes a "rifle target" It was NOT a MISS according to the definition of a MISS. It was a "P" under the definition of a PROCEDURAL. REF: SHB p.21 also the MISS FLOW CHART on p.40 (go down the LEFT side)
    14 points
  3. “TIL the Australian Navy formally enlisted a six-year-old girl in order to give her medical treatment onboard a navy ship; regulations did not allow for civilians to get medical treatment on navy ships. The girl's official rating was 'mascot', and she was 'discharged' after 8 days of 'service'.:
    11 points
  4. It's a Procedural. No debate whatsoever. Every round HIT an firearm appropriate target. No misses. Targets were NOT hit in the correct order as instructed. Procedural.
    10 points
  5. That’s what happen when you’re shooting into the wind.
    8 points
  6. 8 points
  7. One more time...at that point in the OP scenario, the "pistol targets" are rifle targets...any HIT "out of order" would be a PROCEDURAL.
    7 points
  8. A man was lying in bed, near death. Suddenly he smells the aroma of his favorite toll house cookies, fresh from the oven. He crawls out of bed and drags himself to the head of the stares. He slides down the stairs bumpaty-bump and crawls to the kitchen. He reaches up to the table and grasps one cookie. WHAP! A wooden spoon hits the back of his hand and his wife says: "Don't touch those, they're for the funeral. "
    7 points
  9. On a "standard" stage - there are designated PISTOL targets and designated RIFLE targets. In that example - you are correct. A target designated as pistol struck by a rifle round (or vice versa) is a miss not a P. In other words - pistol targets do not exist as far as rifle is concerned. Rifle targets do not exist as far as pistol is concerned. This rule was created for a couple reasons that I'll cover in a moment. But in the OP - it is stated that rifle was specifically instructed to engage BOTH rifle (further) targets and PISTOL (closer) targets - the confusion is calling the closer targets, PISTOL targets - they are PISTOL/ RIFLE targets. Meaning while the RIFLE (further) targets do not exist for the PISTOLS (any pistol round that struck one would be a miss) - the RIFLE (further) targets AND the PISTOL/ RIFLE (closer) targets both exist as options for the rifle. Rounds hitting ANY of these targets cannot be called as misses - ANY of these RIFLE appropriate targets struck out of order creates a P. Reason(s) for the rule (gamer and otherwise): Back in the bad old days - rifle targets "were sometimes" set a ways out - it was faster to engage the PISTOL targets and earn a P than to slow down or eat misses going after distant rifle targets. A shooter eating 50 seconds worth of miss penalties stops that behavior quickly. The other reason is simply because of the realities of target setting; stand limitations and the requirement to provide for a CLEAN MISS. Sometimes targets are set poorly; sometimes a club lacks height differentiation stands and sometimes an array that looked good on paper doesn't translate to real life. In these instances - an errant pistol round may miss pistol steel and strike rifle steel or vice versa thru no fault of the shooter. Previously this would incur a P for the strike on the "wrong" target - but this was unfair to penalize the shooter for (what is supposed to be an error or brainfade penalty) which was in actuality the fault of the target setters or match director. i.e. not allowing for a clean miss. Now the shooter actually is awarded the penalty that they earned which is the miss on the firearm appropriate target.
    5 points
  10. TO cannot overrule spotters on misses, but TO has final say (with input from spotters) on calling a P.
    5 points
  11. Success! I took the diamond tipped bit and slowly etched and ground a groove to fit a small screwdriver in it. I used a pin punch to get the screw to move and finished it with a screwdriver for glasses. It came right out. The barrel band wouldn't come off as the remnant held it in place. I then went to the local hardware store/ sports store. They didn't have any gun screws in the nut and bolt area so I wandered to the firearms department. The nice man said they don't keep screws there for sale but he rummaged around and found a screw that was close enough that I could make work. It took me a heck of a lot longer to get the screw in the fore stok band than getting the barrel band situated. Alls well that ends well. Not a bad piece of finagling if I don't say so myself.
    5 points
  12. Our little boy Chris (52 years old) is down for deer season. Mary made a batch of oatmeal raisin cookies. Chris was heading back out to hunt, she gave him two cookies. A few minutes later, I slipped into the kitchen and stole one from the cooling rack. I heading back to my chair, Mary gave me "the look". "Stay out of them." Never mind she just gave Chris two. "But he's going out hunting.". Reminded me of the Tim Allen show, Home Improvement where the men were in the hardware store and someone's wife gave "the look".
    4 points
  13. Jonathan Winters' career started as a result of a lost wristwatch, about six or seven months after his marriage wife Eileen Schauder in 1948. The newlyweds couldn't afford to buy another one. Then Eileen read about a talent contest in which the first prize was a wristwatch, and encouraged Jonathan to "go down and win it." She was certain he could, and he did. He was then hired as a morning disc jockey at WING in Dayton, Ohio, where he made up for his inability to attract guests by inventing them. “I’d make up people like Dr. Hardbody of the Atomic Energy Commission, or an Englishman whose blimp had crash-landed in Dayton,” he told U.S. News and World Report in 1988. When Stanley Kramer offered him a part in "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World" (1963), he almost didn't take it because he had just recovered from a nervous breakdown. His wife talked him into it. Winters often called himself a satirist, but the term does not really apply. In “Seriously Funny,” his history of 1950s and 1960s comedians, Gerald Nachman described him, a bit floridly, as “part circus clown and part social observer, Red Skelton possessed by the spirit of Daumier.” In 1961 Variety wrote, “His humor is more universally acceptable than any of the current New Comics, with the possible exception of Bob Newhart, because he covers the mass experiences of the U.S. common man — the Army, the gas station, the airport.” More influential than successful, Mr. Winters circled the comic heavens tracing his own strange orbit, an object of wonder and admiration to his peers. “Jonathan taught me,” Robin Williams told the correspondent Ed Bradley on “60 Minutes," “that the world is open for play, that everything and everybody is mockable, in a wonderful way.” Happy Birthday, Jonathan Winters! "Jonathan joined the United States Marine Corps during his senior year of high school. Johnathon served in the Pacific He served on the USS Wisconsin, the aircraft carrier, USS Bonhome Richard and he served as an anti-aircraft gunner on Okinawa. "
    4 points
  14. 4 points
  15. We were living on the Marine air station at Iwakuni in May of 1959. On May Day that year, a bunch of commies rioted at the base entrance, so the base fire department turned the hoses on them. Thus ended the riot. Seems we could resurrect that tactic for some of today’s antics.
    4 points
  16. Or as my father explained to me one time, "HE DEPARTED TO DEFECATE, AND WAS DEVOURED BY THE SWINE".
    4 points
  17. I’m about half way through and it’s getting pretty good. Lots of characters and plots to develop. Don’t know for sure yet but this may be the one that reveals why he left the Army.
    3 points
  18. Scarlett is a fierce bullet competitor but she never let that get in the way of a friendship. She is a shy gal but put a bullhorn in her hand and she comes right outta that shell. Scarlett has a rye sense of humor. My birthday fell on Sunday at the Ides of March. So what did she give me? Bullets by Scarlett, of course. Congratulations, Scarlett! Job well done.
    3 points
  19. Chuck Norris was petting a tiger. Suddenly the tiger began to utter a soft growl. The trainer said, "get up slowly and back away." So, the tiger did.
    3 points
  20. 3 points
  21. OK, that does it! I won't be dropping my Kimber anymore!!
    3 points
  22. Tolt my grandmaw that when I was a yonker! I b’lieve I STILL have welts on my butt!!
    3 points
  23. ........ well, behavin' badly is still "behavin'" ........
    3 points
  24. I can tell you that a series 70 Colt Combat Gov’t WILL fire when dropped straight down muzzle first with the hammer down and the chamber loaded. I know because I did it. I had a Colt 1991A1 that had a firing pin block that was disengaged when the trigger was pulled. After my experience with my first 1911 I treated the gun as if it could fire if dropped.
    3 points
  25. My pair of webleys. Love these guns. Big Gus
    3 points
  26. Reminds me of a Paul Harvey rest of the story. New York, early 1900s. Kid was being abused by their parents. Law couldn't do anything about it. No law that says parents couldn't beat their kids. Humane Society stepped in. Said that the child was an animal. All humans are animals. And it was illegal in New York to beat animals. And that's how they got the parents arrested. And eventually new laws.
    3 points
  27. Because the ground is harder then it was 70 years ago causing me not to bounce as good as I use to.
    3 points
  28. 3 points
  29. TOTENKOPF Deputy Sheriff Marnie Keller slammed the cruiser's door and stomped toward the group on the football field. "NOW WHAT'S THIS I HEAR ABOUT A BUNCH OF HELL RAISIN' TROUBLE MAKIN' SORTS!" she yelled, her voice pitched to carry: she shouldered her way into the center of the group, then she threw her head back and laughed, seized two of the men, hugged them to her and laughed, and they laughed with her: a half dozen men crowded in, demanding their turn, some hoisting her off the ground they way they used to hoist her pale eyed grandmother, back when they were young, when they were skinny, when they were football players for Firelands. Football practice was at an utter and absolute halt. Most of the players had some idea what was going on. The coaches all did. The remainder of the Firelands High School Football Team did what puzzled young men do when a woman comes in and causes utter confusion. The stood, and they stared. Marnie curled her lip, whistled, thrust a knife-hand at the head coach. "HEY COACH! HOW'S THEIR ROAD WORK?" "LACKING!" came the shout. "THEY NEED CONDITIONED!" Deputy Sheriff Marnie Keller looked at one of the fathers, lifted her chin, then grinned in absolute delight. One of the fathers raised a pole, and on the pole, a pennant, and on the pennant, a skull, missing its lower jaw. "FALL IN, DAMN YOU, OR I'LL HAVE YOUR GUTS FOR GARTERS!" Marnie screamed. "EVERY LAST ONE OF YOU MISERABLE EXCUSES FOR A HUMAN BEING, FALL IN!" Fathers of the football players fell in, the way they had for a pale eyed Sheriff who used to scream at them in the same manner, a pale eyed woman who ran with them, who ranked them and spaced them and paced them, a woman the fathers remembered as one of the most inspiring people they'd ever known. "Firelands, Delta Mary Seven, on site for assigned special detail, out of vehicle." "Roger that." "GUIDON!" Marnie barked. Five wide, four deep, the Firelands Football Team, arranged into ranks by their knowing fathers, looked at one another: the fathers, behind, made a smaller block, but their ranks were just as precise. "DRESS RIGHT, DRESS!" Marnie waited until fathers slipped between the ranks, explained to sons and sons of friends, waited until the ranks were dressed. The guidon was carried to the front, and Marnie's eyes narrowed: she thrust a knife hand at the skinniest member of the football team, called him by name, waved him to the front. She stood him between two linebackers in the front row, then had him pace forward -- "Pace off on the left, toward me, halt!" She thrust the guidon into his surprised hands, then laid her hands on his shoulders. "You," she said quietly, "are the patrol leader. You'll set the pace. Everyone will look to you for that leadership." He looked surprsied, then grinned suddenly, the way a young man will when he is suddenly given a good dose of confidence. "ALL RIGHT, WHO'S THE MEDIC?" Teammates looked at one another, turned and looked at a young man in the next to last row. "MEDIC, FALL OUT, WITH ME!" Fathers looked at one another and grinned, but did not break ranks. Marnie laid her hand on his shoulder, guided him to the rear of her cruiser. "You know CPR," she said. He nodded. "You teach CPR." He nodded again. "That's the best way to learn something, teach it. How about first aid?" "I'm too young to test for EMT, but I passed their course." Marnie stopped, looked at him again. "I thought I recognized you!" she said quietly, then opened the back of the cruiser. "This should be old home week for you, then." She thrust a backpack into his arms. He grinned -- a quick, boyish grin: it was the same backpack he'd trained with when he took the training with the Firelands Fire Department. "Here. Let's get this on you. Turn around." He ran his arms through the padded shoulder straps; Marnie adjusted them just a little, ran the waist belt around him, nodded, then reached into the cruiser and brought out two bottles of water, thrust them into their pockets on the front of his orange-nylon harness. "I need you right where you were," she said. "You'll fall back with any Tail End Charlie, anyone with cramps, any injury." He nodded. "BACK IN RANKS, SOLDIER," Marnie yelled, jogging to the front: "YOU'RE NOT ON VACATION HERE! ALL RIGHT, YOU SORRY BUNCH, LET'S SEE IF YOU CAN KEEP UP WITH A MERE GIRL! YOU WILL RUN IN STEP, YOU WILL STAY WITH ME, YOU WILL SING WHEN I SING, YOU WILL STOP WHEN I STOP, DO YOU GET ME?" "WE GET YOU SIR!" every one of the grinning fathers shouted, their enthusiastic, unified yell echoing off the brick side of the high school building. "GUIDON, UP! DETAIL! FORWARD!" The Firelands Football Team, both past and present, leaned forward into a nice easy run: strong young men, motivated by a pale eyed woman, the way the Firelands Football Team had been motivated, falling into a unified running cadence the way their fathers had, when their fathers were their age. Willamina's Warriors, and their sons, ran once again behind a pale eyed woman, and behind the same hand embroidered Totenkopf guidon that led Willamina's Warriors not many years before.
    3 points
  30. I really don’t know, but I would have bet money the .25 would be quieter with the same weight of bullet. But then I realized the .25 would be a 50 grain. So, I will say the .22 Short would be quieter. EDIT: If those were my only choices I would use a long skinny knife.
    3 points
  31. More permanent than marking with paint or ink, as a way to ensure the case is always oriented in the chamber the same way each time. By chance was the prior owner a BPCR competitor? I would feel absolutely fine reloading them and using them in a single shot... a repeater, I'd watch how they look after the first time... If no ill effect, I'd continue using them.
    3 points
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